Purple and yellow crocuses

Paisely abbey

Image by Derek Crowe, 2010 (www.derekcrowe.com)

Purple and yellow crocuses in front of Paisley Abbey sacristy.

Paisley Abbey is a former Cluniac monastery, and current Church of Scotland parish kirk.  The abbey, about seven miles from Glasgow, Scotland, UK,  was founded in the 12th century as a monastery of the Cluniac Order by thirteen monks from Much Wenlock in Shropshire, England, UK.  The monks established a priory on the site of an old Celtic church founded by St Mirin in the 6th century.  In 1245, the priory was raised to the status of an abbey, answerable only to the pope in Rome.

It is believed that William Wallace, who played a key part in the 13th century Wars of Scottish Independence, was educated by the monks of Paisley Abbey.  A mere 8 centuries later, and  Scottish Independence is on the agenda again, with the Scottish Independence Referendum taking place in Scotland on 18th September, 2014.

Fr Frank’s First Mass

Fr Frank Wainwright celebrated his First Mass at St Gregory’s Church, Cheltenham, UK, yesterday morning.

franks 1st mass 6b

Concelebrating at the 11.15am Mass were the parish priest, Canon Bosco MacDonald VF, the recently ordained Fr David McDonald, also of St Gregory’s, Fr Lucasz, from Poland, and Fr John Causey, from Wigan.  They were assisted by Deacon Robin Littlewood, from St Gregory’s.

I hope some photos of the Mass will make their way to me in the next few days.  In the meantime, a few of those taken in the sacristy beforehand.

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Fr Frank and Fr John in the sacristy before Mass.

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Fr David and Fr Frank in the sacristy before Mass.

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Nearly there.

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On his way.

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There he goes.

Ordination day at Clifton Cathedral

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Fr Frank Wainwright (Image by Joe Meigh)

Deacon Frank Wainwright was ordained to the priesthood by the Rt Rev’d Declan Lang, Bishop of Clifton, on the feast day of Saints Joachim and Ann, parents of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Saturday 26th July, 2014, at 11am in Clifton Cathedral, Bristol, UK.  It was a great day of celebration for Fr Frank, his family and friends, parishioners from St Gregory’s with St Thomas More, in Cheltenham, where Fr Frank had been a deacon since June, 2009, as well as the wider Catholic community.

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Fr Colin Mason, Fr Dominic Findlay-Wilson, Fr Frank Wainwright (Image by Joe Meigh)

Fr Frank was ordained along with Fr Dominic Findlay-Wilson and Fr Colin Mason.  We keep them all in our prayers.

Concelebrating the Mass with Bishop Declan was The Rt Revd Crispian Hollis, Bishop Emeritus of Portsmouth, and more than 80 priests form within and without Clifton Diocese.  After the opening hymn, Alleluia, sing to Jesus, Bishop Declan warmly welcomed Frank’s, Dominic’s and Colin’s families and friends to the cathedral.  The Reading was from the Book of Ecclesiasticus 44: 1, 10-15, followed by Psalm 33 (sung), and then the Gospel of St Matthew 13: 16-17 (sung).

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Image by Joe Meigh

Calling of the Candidates.  Colin Mason, Dominic Findlay-Wilson and Frank Wainwright (left to right) after being called forward.

During his homily, Bishop Declan spoke to the ordinands on the role of the priesthood, summing up what is at its heart by quoting Pope Francis who said: “Priests should be shepherds living with the smell of sheep.”

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Image by Joe Meigh

The Laying on of Hands and The Prayer of Ordination.  This is the central action of the Ordination Rite.  Bishop Declan laid his hands on Frank’s head in silence.  He was followed by all the priests present.  The Bishop then said The Prayer of Ordination.

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Image by Joe Meigh

Fr John Blacker, former parish priest of St Gregory’s Church, Cheltenham.

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Image by Joe Meigh

Canon Alan Finlay, Cathedral Dean, and former parish priest of Sacred Hearts Church, Charlton Kings, Cheltenham.

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Image by Joe Meigh

Canon Bosco MacDonald VF, parish priest of St Gregory’s Church, Cheltenham.

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Image by Joe Meigh

The Vesting.  Fr Frank’s mother brought forward his Chasuble.  Frank was vested by Canon Bosco MacDonald VF, with the Stole and Chasuble, the symbolic vestments of the priest.

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Image by Joe Meigh

During the Vesting, Veni Creator Spiritus was sung.

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Image by Joe Meigh

Vested and ready to go.

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Image by Joe Meigh

The Anointing of the Hands.  Bishop Declan anointed the hands of the newly ordained Fr Frank with the oil of Chrism as a symbol of consecration to the Lord’s work.  A paten and a chalice as well as the bread and wine for the celebration of Mass were presented to the Bishop, who in turn presented them to the newly ordained.  The Bishop then stood and gave Fr Frank, Fr Dominic and Fr Colin the Kiss of Peace.

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Image by Joe Meigh

The Kiss of Peace.  Fr Frank receives the Kiss of Peace from Bishop Declan.

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Image by Joe Meigh

Fr Frank receives the Kiss of Peace from Fr David McDonald, himself ordained only on 11th July, 2014.

We sang Praise to the Lord, the Almighty at the Offertory, Let all mortal flesh post Communion, and the rousing recessional hymn was Tell out, my soul.  After Mass, Fr Frank, Fr Dominic and Fr Colin came out of the sacristy to give First Blessings.

Many thanks to Joe Meigh, a parishioner of St Gregory’s, who took these lovely photographs that speak so beautifully of the day.

A visit to the cathedral

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Rt Rev’d Declan Lang, Bishop of Clifton

A visit to the cathedral today.  For now it’s enough to say it was another very happy occasion that begins with “priestly” and ends in “ordination”.  Congratulations Fr Frank Wainwright.  And congratulations also to Fr Dominic Findlay-Wilson and Fr Colin Mason.

The tartan bonete

Day 2 of the Commonwealth Games.

Bonete in Tartan_1

A St Ninian tartan bonete, from the Philippi Collection www.philippi-collection.blogspot.co.uk

It’s a bonete.  A St Ninian tartan bonete.  Of course.

Instead of the biretta, Spanish clergy wear a bonete.  I wonder if there any Spanish / Scottish St Ninian’s tartan bonete wearing clergy out there?  It’s an image I would love to post before the end of the Commonwealth Games on 3rd August.

Bonete in Tartan_2

A St Ninian tartan bonete, from the Philippi Collection www.philippi-collection.blogspot.co.uk

The St Ninian’s tartan was made exclusively for the visit of Pope Benedict XVI to Scotland on 16th September, 2010, St Ninian’s feast day.  The tartan was designed by Matthew Newsome, from the Scottish Tartan Museum, based in North Carolina, USA, and woven by Ingles Buchan, who are based in Glasgow, Scotland, UK.

For a biretta (as opposed to a bonete) fix, see here for rose and here for green.

St Ninian, pray for us

Scottish Saints vestments worn by five Scottish bishops

Day One of the Commonwealth Games is over.  I had this fanciful idea that a Scottish theme might be possible until the Games finish on the 3rd August.  It’s tough already . . .

Scottish Saints vestments

Source: Sacred Threads Guild – www.sacredthreads.org

Scottish Saints vestments worn by five Scottish bishops.  If only I could find some room in the sacristy for more vestments . . .

The Friendly Games and the not so friendly sacristy door

The Opening Ceremony of the Friendly Games gets under way in under an hour.  The Friendly Games are of course, less well known as the Commonwealth Games.  Hosted by Glasgow, Scotland, UK, the Games proper kick off tomorrow morning, finishing on Sunday 3rd August.  So that’s the Friendly Games in Glasgow.  And this is the not so friendly sacristy door, also in Glasgow . . .

glasgow cathedral sacristy door

It’s not the friendliest of doors because this original oak sacristy door, in Glasgow Cathedral, is riddled with bullets.  The plaque on the wall next to it explains.  The bullet holes are evidence of “troubled times.”  The Reformation.  Back to the Friendly Games then . . .

Noli me Tangere

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“Noli me Tangere”, a fresco attributed to Mariotto di Nardo

“Noli me Tangere”, a fresco attributed to the Italian painter, Mariotto di Nardo, is In the sacristy of the 12th century Church of San Niccolò Oltrarno in Florence, Italy.

According to John 20:17, “noli me tangere”, Latin for “touch me not”, are the words spoken by Jesus to Mary Magdalene when she recognized him after the Resurrection.

St Mary Magdalene, pray for us

Water courtyard and fountain

On yet another hot day, wouldn’t it be great to have a courtyard with a fountain right by the sacristy?  Here’s the very thing, the sacristy water courtyard with its very own fountain at the Holy Name of St Mary Church, in Hanau, Germany.

Water Courtyard

Sacristy Water Courtyard, Holy Name of St Mary Church, Hanau, Germany

But I have to say it’s not what I was imagining.  I was thinking of something along these lines,  just outside the sacristy . . .

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The cloister of Catedral de la Santa Creu, Barcelona, Spain. Image by Emanuele Nicastro

 

“The Sacristan” by Harry Morley (1881-1943)

The Sacristan

© copyright The Artist’s Estate

The Sacristan  by Harry Morley (1881-1943), a line engraving, 16.5cm x 12cm.

“Harry Morley was born in Leicester. He studied at Leicester School of Art; and later architecture at the Royal College of Art, London, winning a travelling scholarship to Italy. His experiences in Italy encouraged him to become a painter, and he attended the Académie Julian in Paris. He was appointed an official war artist in 1940 and taught for a time at St Martin’s School of Art, London. His earlier works were inspired by his travels in Italy and were influenced by the engraver, Robert Austin.” (British Council)

One of those comparisons we like to make when it gets a little bit hot

In London today the temperature reached 32 degrees Celsius at 2.05pm, while in Hamilton, Bermuda, the highest temperature reached was 29 degrees Celsius.  Just one of those comparisons we like to make in the UK when it gets a little bit hot.

Bermuda chalice and paten

This silver chalice and paten are brought from the vault to the sacristy only on very special occasions at St Peter’s Church, in St George’s, Bermuda.  At just over 400 years old (1612), St Peter’s is reputed the oldest Anglican church in continuous use outside of the UK.  

The chalice and paten are part of the “royal silver,” the 1697 Communion set of two flagons, a chalice, a paten, and an alms basin, all bearing the royal coat of arms of William III and Queen Mary.  William III and Queen Mary never used them, however, as they never visited Bermuda.

Paring down

After all the excitement of the ordination last Friday – did I mention the ordination by the way – it’s been good to pare things down a bit, to focus on the essentials.  That’s a beautiful thing to do.  Here’s a lovely picture of Chapel de la Cordelle sacristy in the town of Vézelay, Burgundy, France.

chapelle cordelle

Image by Louise Peters

Built in 1146-1170 after St Bernard preached there on the Second Crusade, and consecrated in 1152, today 3 Franciscans serve the chapel, welcoming pilgrims on their way to Santiago de Compostela in Spain.

Fr David’s First Mass

Fr David McDonald celebrated his First Mass on Saturday 12th July, 2014, at St Gregory’s Church, Cheltenham, UK.

Fr David head shot

Fr David in the sacristy before Mass, with a small bust of St John Vianney, patron saint of priests, looking down at him.

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Nearly there.

David first Mass 1

Image by Clive Deedie

Mass under way.

David first Mass 2

Image by Clive Deedie

The Gospel.

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Image by Clive Deedie

All done.

Ordination Day at St Gregory’s Church, Cheltenham

More photos of Fr David McDonald’s ordination to the priesthood that took place last Friday on the feast of St Benedict, in St Gregory’s Church, Cheltenham, UK.

DAVID procession in

Image by Clive Deedie

DAVID beginning of Mass

Image by Clive Deedie

Calling of the Candidate.  After the opening prayers of the Mass and the Scripture readings, the ordaining Bishop, Bishop Declan Lang, called David McDonald, the priestly candidate, by name. David answered “Present” and stepped forward.

DAVID priest designate

Image by Clive Deedie

Presentation and Inquiry.  Bishop Declan then asked for testimony that David had received proper training and was worthy of ordination.  Canon Bosco MacDonald, St Gregory’s parish priest, attested that David was prepared and had been approved for ordination.

Acceptance.  Bishop Declan then said: “We rely on the help of the Lord God and our Saviour Jesus Christ, and we choose this man, our brother, for priesthood in the presbyterial order.”   Everyone present responded “Thanks be to God.”

DAVID examination

Image by Clive Deedie

Examination of the Candidate.  David approached Bishop Declan who asked him if he was willing to serve Christ and his Church as a faithful priest.

Promise of Obedience.  Hand in hand with Bishop Declan, David then promised respect and obedience to the bishop and his successors.

DAVID prostrate

Image by Clive Deedie

Prayer for the Candidate.  Bishop Declan knelt and invited all of those present to join in prayer for the candidate.  This period of prayer included the Litany of the Saints, a moving and memorable moment in the ordination ritual.  David prostrated himself before the altar as the prayers of the Litany invoked God’s saving mercy and the intercession of all the saints to send down the Holy Spirit upon him.

DAVID laying on of hands

Image by Clive Deedie

Laying on of Hands.  This is the most solemn moment of the ordination and the essential act in the sacrament of Holy Orders.  Bishop Declan ordained David by laying his hands on  David’s head and praying silently as he invoked the Holy Spirit upon the new priest.

DAVID laying on of hands 2

Image by Clive Deedie

DAVID laying on of hands 3

Image by Clive Deedie

DAVID laying on of hands 4

Image by Clive Deedie

DAVID laying on of hands 5

Image by Clive Deedie

The One Priesthood of Christ.  All the other priests who were present also joined in the ordination ceremony.  Each one in turn laid his hands upon the head of the newly ordained priests.  This signifies that they all belong to, and participate in, the one priesthood of Jesus Christ.  It is also a sign welcoming the newly ordained into their common brotherhood as priests.

DAVID vesting

Image by Clive Deedie

Vesting the New Priest.  Fr David, newly ordained, removed his deacon’s stole and was presented with the symbols of his new office in the Church: a priestly stole and chasuble.  Canon Bosco MacDonald assisted with the vesting of the stole and chasuble.

DAVID anointing of hands

Image by Clive Deedie

Anointing of the Hands.  Bishop Declan anointed the palms of Fr David with the oil of chrism.  “The Father anointed our Lord Jesus Christ through the power of the Holy Spirit. May Jesus preserve you to sanctify the Christian people and to offer sacrifice to God.”

DAVID presentation of the gifts

Image by Clive Deedie

Presentation of the Gifts.  After the gifts of bread and wine were brought to the altar by two of Fr David’s sons, Bishop Declan gave the paten and the chalice to Fr David.  These are the vessels used at each Mass to hold the sacred Body and Blood of Christ in the Eucharist.

DAVID paten and chalice

Image by Clive Deedie

As Fr David received the chalice and paten, Bishop Declan said: “Accept from the holy people of God the gifts to be offered to Him.  Know what you are doing, and imitate the mystery you celebrate: model your life on the mystery of the Lord’s cross.”

DAVID kiss of peace 1

Image by Clive Deedie

DAVID kiss of peace 2

Image by Clive Deedie

The Kiss of Peace.  Bishop Declan stood to give the kiss of peace to Fr David and the priests present came forward and also gave Fr David the kiss of peace.

DAVID bishop incensing

Image by Clive Deedie

DAVID liturgy of the eucharist

Image by Clive Deedie

Liturgy of the Eucharist.  After the ordination ritual itself had finished, the Mass, concelebrated with Bishop Declan by Fr David and all priests present, continued as usual.

DAVID communion

Image by Clive Deedie

Communion.  Fr David assisted with the distribution of Communion.

DAVID end

Image by Clive Deedie

DAVID end 1

Image by Clive Deedie

First Priestly Blessings.  After Mass, Fr David gave his blessing to all of his family, friends and those who had joined him in the celebration.  

Many thanks to Clive Deedie, a parishioner of St Gregory’s, for these wonderful photographs.

 

And the Catholic Church had another priest

Ordination order of service

Deacon David McDonald was ordained to the priesthood by the Rt Rev’d Declan Lang, Bishop of Clifton, on the Feast of St Benedict, Friday 11th July 2014 at 11am in the Catholic Church of St Gregory the Great, Cheltenham.  It was a great day for Fr David, his family and friends, the parish of St Gregory’s with St Thomas More, and the wider Catholic community.

Fr David has been a part of St Gregory’s parish community for 44 years, the last 26 of which he served as a deacon.   More than 20 priests concelebrated the Mass, including former parish priests and curates of St Gregory’s, priests from the Ecumenical Society of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and the Abbot and monks of Prinknash Abbey where Fr David has been a Benedictine Oblate for many years.  It was no surprise then that the entry hymn was Our Blessed Father Benedict.

Fr David in sacristy after ordination

Fr Bill Mcloughlin OSM, Hon Gen Secretary of ESBVM, and Fr David in the sacristy

After the opening hymn, Bishop Declan warmly welcomed Fr David’s family and friends, all those who had helped him on his long journey to the priesthood, and his dear wife Margaret who was surely watching over him on this special day.  The Reading was from the book of Proverbs 2:1-9, followed by Psalm 33, and then the Gospel of St Matthew 19:27-29.  Bishop Declan spoke from the heart to Fr David on the role of the priest as the Good Shepherd.

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One of Fr David’s daughters brought forward the chasuble and stole from the Chapel of St Benedict.  We sang Come Holy Ghost, Creator Come and All My Hope On God Is Founded.  Two of Fr David’s sons brought forward the gifts.  We sang two Communion hymns, O Food of Travellers, Angels’ Bread and O Bread of Heaven, Beneath This Veil.  The recessional hymn was Praise We Our God With Joy.

After Mass, Fr David came out of the sacristy and gave First Blessings to all who asked.

And then, after all the spiritual nourishment we had received at the Mass, everyone headed into the Old Priory for some nourishment of a different kind.  And a good time was had by all.

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The flower ladies did a great job of decorating the church with arrangements of Scottish flowers and pillar candles in the window recesses decorated with McDonald Clan ribbons.  Altar servers were out in force, reaching double figures, and included 4 boys from St Gregory’s Junior School and All Saints’ Academy.  The organist played beautifully as he always does.  And the Catholic Church had another priest.

St Benedict, pray for us

Our Lady of Aberdeen, pray for us

St Margaret, pray for us